Fatigue and Tiredness After a Stroke

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Fatigue and Tiredness After a Stroke

As I am writing this post I am roughly 8.5 years post stroke so keep that in mind. I still have fatigue. So thinking back one of my questions I would repeat often while in the rehab facility was: “what time is it?” When I would ask I would ask it three or more times all within a minute or so. I am guessing that I was repeating myself like that because of the damage my brain had endured through the stroke. What’s more important was why I was asking this question. The reason was because all day through all of my therapy what I looked forward to the most was going back to my room so I could sleep.

My stroke was in December of 2008, after two weeks in Redwood City, five weeks in acute care Vallejo, and about month at my mother’s house, my wife and I found ourselves moving in to our current house on Valentines Day of 2009. I was still on several medications and sleeping about 3/4 of the day if not more. I was waking up to eat and use the restroom.

Fast forward to now (there is much between) when I’m tired my body let’s me know. I lose balance more easily, I begin to see double, I drool, etc.

I have continuously pushed myself through therapy to this day. Often on average 2 days per week I commute to or from work on my bike 20 miles.

Visit my gym as I have time. I started working last May as an Information Systems Analyst for the California State Controllers Office. In addition I have my own business:

www.mdccomputersolutions.com

www.facebook.com/MDCComputerSolutions

www.instagram.com/MDCComputerSolutions

At my day job I recently switched to a 9-8-80 schedule, the 9 hour days are often harder to get through, but get every other Friday off and It is well worth it. I get lots done that I would not have the opportunity for otherwise.

Any questions about my experiences with Fatigue and Sleep please leave them in the comments and I will do my best to answer them.

In addition I am doing a fundraiser please check it out: www.yourdonationplease.com

Thank you for taking the time to read,

Matt


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10%–15% of all stroke patients are young adults

Know the signs of a stroke… save a life…

ActFAST

 

If you have come across this page, at the very least I would like you to always remember the acronym F.A.S.T. (Face, Arms, Speech & Time) Because stroke is very uncommon in young adults, it often gets misdiagnosed and overlooked. The most important thing below is the second sentence. The information below was sourced from the  National Center for Biotechnology Information and the U.S. National Library of Medicine. At the bottom there is a link to the full document if interested, it is a good read.

Strokes in young adults are reported as being uncommon, comprising 10%–15% of all stroke patients. However, compared with stroke in older adults, stroke in the young has a disproportionately large economic impact by leaving victims disabled before their most productive years. Recent publications report an increased incidence of stroke in young adults. This is important given the fact that younger stroke patients have a clearly increased risk of death compared with the general population. The prevalence of standard modifiable vascular risk factors in young stroke patients is different from that in older patients. Modifiable risk factors for stroke, such as dyslipidemia, smoking, and hypertension, are highly prevalent in the young stroke population, with no significant difference in geographic, climatic, nutritional, lifestyle, or genetic diversity. The list of potential stroke etiologies among young adults is extensive. Strokes of undetermined and of other determined etiology are the most common types among young patients according to TOAST (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. Prevention is the primary treatment strategy aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality related to stroke. Therefore, primary prevention is very important with regard to stroke in young adults, and aggressive treatment of risk factors for stroke, such as hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, is essential. The best form of secondary stroke prevention is directed toward stroke etiology as well as treatment of additional risk factors. However, there is a lack of specific recommendations and guidelines for stroke management in young adults. In conclusion, strokes in young adults are a major public health problem and further research, with standardized methodology, is needed in order to give us more precise epidemiologic data. Given the increasing incidence of stroke in the young, there is an objective need for more research in order to reduce this burden.

 

*source


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